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dc.contributor.authorClarkson, Lynn
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-08T18:47:31Z
dc.date.available2017-06-08T18:47:31Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/51458
dc.description.abstractThere is a need to manage for purity when meeting client quality standards in commercial-scale handling of conventional, GE, and organic Identity preservation (IP) is essential when multiple pathways to the marketplace exist for an individual commodity. IP provides market access by growing and delivering a crop as it is desired, creating a competitive advantage in the marketplace. Managing for purity begins with the grower, regardless of whether a crop is GE, organic, or based on functional traits. Segregation buffers support farmers’ choices and minimize the potential impacts of their neighbors’ market choices. Premiums for delivering quality and purity in contracts are a strong inducement for growers
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNABC
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectAgricultural biotechnology
dc.subjectsustainability
dc.subjectstewardship
dc.subjectgenetical engineering
dc.subjectGMO
dc.subjectGE crops
dc.subjectresistance
dc.subjectresistance management
dc.subjectcoexistence
dc.subjectseed industry
dc.subjectlabeling
dc.subjectinsect resistance
dc.titleSegregating GMO crops—cultural and functional challenges
dc.typebook chapter


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