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dc.contributor.authorBennett, Alan
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-08T17:34:44Z
dc.date.available2017-06-08T17:34:44Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/51411
dc.description.abstractThe intellectual-property landscape for transformation has shifted. Sponsors of translational research are increasingly interested in clearing IP barriers in advance of making grant awards. And plant-gene patents may become moot, if the Supreme Court rules similarly to their opinion on human genes.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNABC
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectAgricultural biotechnology
dc.subjectspecialty crops
dc.subjecttransgenic papaya
dc.subjectstakeholders
dc.subjectgenetic engineering
dc.subjectGE
dc.subjectGMO
dc.subjectregulation
dc.subjectfood safety
dc.subjectUSDA
dc.subjectnovel traits
dc.subjectpremarket approval
dc.subjectintellectual property
dc.subjectpatents
dc.subjecthuman health impacts
dc.subjectsynthetic genomics
dc.titleIntellectual property for crop transformation: A continuing saga for agricultural innovation in the public sector
dc.typebook chapter


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