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dc.contributor.authorSchuerman, Peter
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-08T17:34:44Z
dc.date.available2017-06-08T17:34:44Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/51410
dc.description.abstractThe commercialization of genetically engineered traits in specialty crops is a complicated process. University researchers are more accustomed to thinking about innovation as an event rather than as a process. Within Texas A&M AgriLife Research we are taking on the challenge of how to look at innovation as a process and how to steward innovation beyond simply publishing, to create opportunities for our industry partners. In so doing, we are addressing a fundamental problem: the weakness of the pipeline.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNABC
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectAgricultural biotechnology
dc.subjectspecialty crops
dc.subjecttransgenic papaya
dc.subjectstakeholders
dc.subjectgenetic engineering
dc.subjectGE
dc.subjectGMO
dc.subjectregulation
dc.subjectfood safety
dc.subjectUSDA
dc.subjectnovel traits
dc.subjectpremarket approval
dc.subjectintellectual property
dc.subjectpatents
dc.subjecthuman health impacts
dc.subjectsynthetic genomics
dc.titleCultural shift: Innovation is a process
dc.typebook chapter


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