Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBeachy, Roger N.
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-08T17:34:39Z
dc.date.available2017-06-08T17:34:39Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/51393
dc.description.abstractThe topic of this conference, biotechnology and horticultural crops, is about the ability of producers to make a profit, and how future agriculture, globally, will include specialty crops. Although we cannot accurately predict the future of technical successes or consumer acceptance of new crop varieties, we should be planning ahead, as it can take 10 or more years to bring a new technology to the market. We should be looking ahead at what the economic picture may be—knowing what farming is like today, knowing what smallholders in Africa might want, or what might be useful in the prairies of western Canada, in Florida and other regions of the world
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNABC
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectAgricultural biotechnology
dc.subjectspecialty crops
dc.subjecttransgenic papaya
dc.subjectstakeholders
dc.subjectgenetic engineering
dc.subjectGE
dc.subjectGMO
dc.subjectregulation
dc.subjectfood safety
dc.subjectUSDA
dc.subjectnovel traits
dc.subjectpremarket approval
dc.subjectintellectual property
dc.subjectpatents
dc.subjecthuman health impacts
dc.subjectsynthetic genomics
dc.titleOpportunities and challenges for specialty crops: Will they sell if developed?
dc.typebook chapter


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International

Statistics