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dc.contributor.authorBender, Jeff B.
dc.contributor.authorHueston, William
dc.contributor.authorOsterholm, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-08T15:24:47Z
dc.date.available2017-06-08T15:24:47Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/51359
dc.description.abstractThere are very positive and strong connections between animals and humans, but also reasons for concern because about 61% of all human pathogens are zoonotic. The increase in new diseases, is due to increases in world trade, animal translocation, ecological disruptions, climate change, adaptation of pathogens, and changes in the way we raise animals. Animal health and human health are intertwined, and we should be cognizant of the global consequences of international trade in animals and animal products and the impacts of human population growth on the environment
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNABC
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectAgricultural nanotechnology
dc.subjectfood safety
dc.subjectfood security
dc.subjectsustainability
dc.subjectglobal food security
dc.subjectdeveloping world needs
dc.subjectrisk assessment
dc.subjectthreats
dc.subjectanimal diseases
dc.subjectplant pathogens
dc.subject
dc.titleRecent animal disease outbreaks and their impact on human populations
dc.typebook chapter


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