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dc.contributor.authorKishore, Ganesh M.
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-08T14:00:10Z
dc.date.available2017-06-08T14:00:10Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/51293
dc.description.abstractCorn is being blamed as responsible for global food shortages. Although the United States has consumed significant amounts of corn for biofuel, this usage is unconnected to short­ages of rice, wheat and fruits and vegetables. At most, corn may account for 20% of the current food shortage. Corn is less efficient than sugar cane or sweet sorghum in terms of its biofuel-energy content, but it’s a good starting point on which we can build.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNABC
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectAgricultural biotechnology
dc.subjectbiofuels
dc.subjectbiopolymers
dc.subjectrenewables
dc.subjectbioenergy
dc.subjectbiomass
dc.subjectbiofeedstocks
dc.subjectconversion technologies
dc.subject
dc.titleAgriculture: The foundation of the bioeconomy
dc.typebook chapter


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