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dc.contributor.authorde Gorter, Harry
dc.contributor.authorJust, David R.
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-08T14:00:08Z
dc.date.available2017-06-08T14:00:08Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/51289
dc.description.abstractThis paper provides important insights into the social costs and benefits of key policy instruments. One key insight is how a change in the price of ethanol affects the corn price Because the corn market is now directly linked to the ethanol price, which is directly linked to gasoline prices, any change in oil prices that affects gasoline prices is now directly transmitted to the price of corn for a given level of the tax credit. On the other hand, once a consumption mandate is in place, any changes in oil prices will not directly affect the corn price (only indirectly affecting costs of production). Hence, a mandate will not transmit instability from the oil market to the corn market unlike a tax credit.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNABC
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectAgricultural biotechnology
dc.subjectbiofuels
dc.subjectbiopolymers
dc.subjectrenewables
dc.subjectbioenergy
dc.subjectbiomass
dc.subjectbiofeedstocks
dc.subjectconversion technologies
dc.subject
dc.titleThe social cost and benefits of US biofuel policies
dc.typebook chapter


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