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dc.contributor.authorLee, Benson P
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-08T14:00:05Z
dc.date.available2017-06-08T14:00:05Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/51277
dc.description.abstractOur fuel cell is a high-temperature ceramic device that chemically converts hydrogen into electricity, requiring a little oxygen. The byproducts are water and heat. In order to turn it into something useful, we have to make our own hydrogen, generally by conversion of hydrocarbon fuels. Efficiency is maximized by recovering the heat and water and recycling the latter internally. We also look at the exhaust heat as a way to provide cogeneration and handle heat loads, which can cool as well as heat. And depending on the electrical loads we condition the power.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNABC
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectAgricultural biotechnology
dc.subjectbiofuels
dc.subjectbiopolymers
dc.subjectrenewables
dc.subjectbioenergy
dc.subjectbiomass
dc.subjectbiofeedstocks
dc.subjectconversion technologies
dc.subject
dc.titleEnergy independence: On-site fuel cell systems operating on biofuels
dc.typebook chapter


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