Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorFlavell, Richard B.
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-08T13:36:33Z
dc.date.available2017-06-08T13:36:33Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/51257
dc.description.abstractIn spite of the huge success of converting corn starch into ethanol, this cannot satisfy the challenges set by the US government to produce 35 billion gallons of biofuels per year by 2017. Instead, the growing of dedicated energy crops and converting their cellulose and hemicellulose to ethanol, or the equivalent, is an essential approach. It can produce a much higher ratio of energy output to input than making ethanol from corn and avoids the fuel versus food and feed arguments. Cellulose-derived biofuels are essential to meet the targets set by the US government and aid in the reduction of the rate of increase of CO2 production in the atmosphere.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNABC
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectAgricultural biotechnology
dc.subjectbiofuels
dc.subjectrenewable energy sources
dc.subjectsustainability
dc.subjectbutanol
dc.subjectbiomass
dc.subjectethanol
dc.subjectcellulosic ethanol
dc.subjectenergy security
dc.subject
dc.titleTurning biomass crops for biofuels into commercial reality
dc.typebook chapter


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International

Statistics