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dc.contributor.authorSanford, J.
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-04T15:21:11Z
dc.date.available2007-01-04T15:21:11Z
dc.date.issued1984
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/5124
dc.description.abstractChoice of cultivars is one of the most important and difficult decisions the strawberry grower has to make. To read a typical nursery catalog, all strawberry cultivars are equally "superior" to all the rest. Obviously, it is not that simple. The relative performance of different cultivars can vary enormously. Some cultivars will easily yield twice as much fruit per acre as others, but may or may not prove acceptable for the end use of the buyer. There is a bewildering number of strawberry cultivars commercially available, and new cultivars are being named every year. To make matters even more complicated, each cultivar can vary in its performance from region to region, from year to year, and even from farm to farm. Lastly, the relative value of different cultivars is inherently subjective. People naturally differ in their appraisal of flavors, and growers assign different levels of importance to different characters such as productivity versus firmness versus quality.en_US
dc.format.extent445743 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherNew York State Agricultural Experiment Stationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNew York's Food and Life Sciences Bulletinen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries107en_US
dc.subjectstrawberry cultivarsen_US
dc.subjectNew York strawberry cultivarsen_US
dc.titleStrawberry Cultivars for New Yorken_US
dc.typeperiodicalen_US


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  • Food and Life Sciences Bulletin
    New York's Food and Life Sciences (FLS) Bulletin reports new developments in fruit and vegetable breeding, performance, diseases, and integrated pest management. It is of interest to researchers and the public.

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