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dc.contributor.authorDeborah Delmer
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-08T12:57:25Z
dc.date.available2017-06-08T12:57:25Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/51224
dc.description.abstractAccording to Debbie Delmer, the problems for biotechnology vary according to who you are—a large company dealing with important crops and developed-country farmers, a small private company, a public sector entity, university, national agricultural system or a CGIAR institution. It is difficult to judge the degree to which negative pub­lic perception remains a significant issue. Strong research programs on development of genetically engineered (GE) crops are in progress in China, India and Brazil. Even in the European Union, GE crops are now planted in a few countries
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNABC
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectAgricultural biotechnology
dc.subjecttechnology transfer
dc.subjectintellectual property
dc.subjectregulation
dc.subjectgenetic engineering
dc.subjectpublic good
dc.subjectbioethics
dc.subjectskill development
dc.subjectpublic funding, industry funding
dc.titleRoad bumps and pitfalls for agricultural biotechnology
dc.typebook chapter


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