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dc.contributor.authorWaddell, Kim
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-07T17:49:27Z
dc.date.available2017-06-07T17:49:27Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/51013
dc.description.abstractThe 2000 federal government interagency review of regulatory oversight of biotechnology products revealed that ensuring confinement could become a regulatory requirement for approval of some transgenic organisms. In 2001, the USDA asked the National Academies to review and evaluate biological methods and report on their application in confining transgenic crop plants, shellfish, trees, grasses, fish, microbes, insects and other organisms. Considerations of bioconfinement, when and why to consider it, bioconfinement of plants, animals, microorganisms, and biological and operational considerations for bioconfinement.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNABC
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectAgricultural biotechnology
dc.subjectenvironment, human health
dc.subjectGMO, genetic engineering, pharming
dc.subjectplant based vaccines
dc.subjectmedicinals
dc.subjectregulation
dc.subjectliability, patents
dc.subjectstewardship
dc.titleBiological confinement of GEOs: Opportunities for reducing environmental risks?
dc.typebook chapter


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