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dc.contributor.authorVan Alfen, Neal
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-24T14:14:40Z
dc.date.available2017-05-24T14:14:40Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/50025
dc.description.abstractAlthough the adoption of GM crops has been very rapid in countries that have approved them, there has been resistance in many other countries, particularly in Japan and the European Community. The complexity of the social issues driving this resistance is illustrated by the fact that the countries most resistant to adoption of the technology are also by far the largest users per hectare of pesticides known to cause health and environmental problems. A systems-level approach to evaluation of the relative value and risk of GM technology would entail studies of how this technology might reduce pesticide use in intensively managed crops, conserve soil by adoption of reduced tillage methods, or reduce human health risks.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNABC
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectAgricultural biotechnology
dc.subjectfood safety
dc.subjectfood security
dc.subjectglobal agriculture
dc.subjectdeveloping countries
dc.subjectsustainability
dc.subjectEco-footprint
dc.subjectGMO
dc.subjectprecautionary principle,
dc.titleAgricultural biotechnology: How big is it globally?
dc.typebook chapter


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