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dc.contributor.authorMcCluskey, Jill J.
dc.contributor.authorCurtis, Kynda R.
dc.contributor.authorLi, Quan
dc.contributor.authorWahl, Thomas I.
dc.contributor.authorGrimsrud, Kristine M.
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-24T13:59:32Z
dc.date.available2017-05-24T13:59:32Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/50007
dc.description.abstractCultural differences and values strongly influence attitudes to and acceptance of GM foods. While consumers in Norway and Japan avoid them, while those in China were generally accepting of GM foods. Younger people there seem to be more willing to purchase GM-food products with product-enhancing attributes, which indicates that the Chinese market may be open to GM foods in the future. Additionally, government investment into biotechnology remains strong, as China works to fulfill its self-sufficiency food policies.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNABC
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectAgricultural biotechnology
dc.subjectstakeholders
dc.subjectpublic concern
dc.subjectrisk
dc.subjectsustainability
dc.subjectlabeling
dc.subjectpatents
dc.subjectintellectual property
dc.titleConsumer attitudes and willingness to pay for genetically modified foods: A cross-country comparison
dc.typebook chapter


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