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dc.contributor.authorCook, R. James
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-24T13:59:31Z
dc.date.available2017-05-24T13:59:31Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/50001
dc.description.abstractThe driving forces for most farmers to adopt a new technology includes the potential to increase profits, to save labor, to protect the environment, and to meet demands for safe and wholesome food. The “management used to grow a crop variety and not the variety itself that has impact on the environment.” Some genetically modified plants reduce the use of herbicides and pesticides or confer disease resistance, all welcome traits for producers and consumer. However, a vision is needed for genetic modifications in minor crops for which the current regulatory processes involving EPA, USDA, and FDA is too costly.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNABC
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectAgricultural biotechnology
dc.subjectstakeholders
dc.subjectpublic concern
dc.subjectrisk
dc.subjectsustainability
dc.subjectlabeling
dc.subjectpatents
dc.subjectintellectual property
dc.subject
dc.titleBiotechnology: Cause and Consequence of change in agriculture
dc.typebook chapter


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