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dc.contributor.authorBurkhardt, Jeffrey
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-22T18:48:36Z
dc.date.available2017-05-22T18:48:36Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/49952
dc.description.abstractScientists will be judged in terms of benefits rendered to the human race. Scientists believe that what they are doing is justifiable, yet cannot justify why that is. The bottom line is that biotechnology will provide benefits that are greater than the risks if it is scientific, if it is legal, and if consumers accept it. Scientists must not make promises that they may not be able to keep.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNABC
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectGMO
dc.subjecthuman health
dc.subjectgenetic engineering
dc.subjectcommunication
dc.subjectscience communication
dc.subjectpharming
dc.subjectregulation, trust
dc.subject
dc.titleGenetically engineered “Foods for Health”: Are we asking the right (ethical) questions?
dc.typebook chapter


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