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dc.contributor.authorComstock, Gary
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-22T18:28:57Z
dc.date.available2017-05-22T18:28:57Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/49940
dc.description.abstractThe author has decided that it is ethically justifiable to pursue genetically modified crops and foods because the following three of our most influential ethical traditions converge on a common answer: the rights of people in various countries to choose to adopt GM technology; the balance of likely benefits over harms to consumers and the environment from GM technology; and the wisdom of encouraging discovery, innovation, and careful regulation of GM technology.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNABC
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectAgricultural biotechnology
dc.subjectgenetic engineering
dc.subjectgenetically modified foods
dc.subjectconsumer
dc.subjectproducer
dc.subjectfood industry
dc.subjectscience communication
dc.subjectrisk management
dc.subjectglobalization
dc.subjectintellectual property
dc.subjectanimal biotechnology
dc.subject
dc.titleEthics and genetically modified foods
dc.typebook chapter


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