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dc.contributor.authorForeman, Carol Tucker
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-22T18:28:55Z
dc.date.available2017-05-22T18:28:55Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/49934
dc.description.abstractAgricultural biotechnology offers substantial benefits to farmers, consumers, and the environment. However, the American people have not embraced this new technology. Spurred by such events as the StarLink™ corn contamination and European rejection of genetically modified foods, there is an increasingly visible and contentious debate in this country about the potential risks and benefits of agricultural. If we want to realize the potential benefits of agricultural biotechnology, we must achieve agreement and compromise. We must appreciate some of the factors that contribute to continuing public concern, and consider changes in government regulation that might increase public trust.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNABC
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectAgricultural biotechnology
dc.subjectgenetic engineering
dc.subjectgenetically modified foods
dc.subjectconsumer
dc.subjectproducer
dc.subjectfood industry
dc.subjectscience communication
dc.subjectrisk management
dc.subjectglobalization
dc.subjectintellectual property
dc.subjectanimal biotechnology
dc.subject
dc.titleWhat you see depends on how you grind the lens
dc.typebook chapter


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