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dc.contributor.authorJuanillo, Jr., Napoleon K
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-22T18:28:54Z
dc.date.available2017-05-22T18:28:54Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/49928
dc.description.abstractThe continuing coverage of the risks and benefits of agricultural biotechnology in the media have vigorously put science and the scientist in the public arena, requiring scientists to engage in public discourse they are frequently not well equipped for. It would be reasonable to expect some convergence in the discourse on biotechnology, but instead we see increasing divergence, particularly in Europe and parts of Asia, where public opinion about biotechnology suspicion of GMOs and institutional regulatory remains strong. Lack of communication and communication skills between the actors in this debate are a hurdle.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNABC
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectAgricultural biotechnology
dc.subjectgenetic engineering
dc.subjectgenetically modified foods
dc.subjectconsumer
dc.subjectproducer
dc.subjectfood industry
dc.subjectscience communication
dc.subjectrisk management
dc.subjectglobalization
dc.subjectintellectual property
dc.subjectanimal biotechnology
dc.subject
dc.titleFrames for public discourse on biotechnology
dc.typebook chapter


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