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dc.contributor.authorStirling, Bob
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-22T14:21:43Z
dc.date.available2017-05-22T14:21:43Z
dc.date.issued1997
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/49871
dc.description.abstractLocal farm knowledge is being eroded and, given its relevance to the viability of farm communities, ways have to be found to revive it. Young people often leave farming communities and with them this source of population, knowledge, and skill regeneration is lost to the farm community forever. This trend must be reversed and the loss of community knowledge be replaced by independent public universities and state research agencies, not by private generation of knowledge as has been the trend
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNABC
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectAgricultural biotechnology
dc.subjectenvironment
dc.subjectsustainable agriculture
dc.subjectdrought tolerance
dc.subjectheat tolerance
dc.subjectpesticides
dc.subjectinternational agriculture
dc.subjectfeeding the world
dc.subjectproperty rights
dc.subjectpublic funding of research
dc.subject
dc.titleFarm knowledge: machines versus biotechnology
dc.typebook chapter


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