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dc.contributor.authorGertler, Michael E.
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-22T14:21:43Z
dc.date.available2017-05-22T14:21:43Z
dc.date.issued1997
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/49870
dc.description.abstractBiotechnology researchers are working in the university-industrial complex and seek public support for an agenda driven by cold cash and corporate competition. Expensive and ethically challenged research and development efforts are sold to the public via appeals to environmental protection and alleviation of famine. After decades promoting specialization, extension departments have focused on diversification. Many of the heralded ideas of conventional agriculture are now seen as ill-advised. In turn, the claims surrounding agricultural biotechnology will also be modified as we discover limitations, costs, and alternatives. The problem this time, however, may mean that their impacts can be threatening to the planet as well as damaging to local ecologies, economies, and communities
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNABC
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectAgricultural biotechnology
dc.subjectenvironment
dc.subjectsustainable agriculture
dc.subjectdrought tolerance
dc.subjectheat tolerance
dc.subjectpesticides
dc.subjectinternational agriculture
dc.subjectfeeding the world
dc.subjectproperty rights
dc.subjectpublic funding of research
dc.subject
dc.titleBiotechnology and social issues in rural agricultural communities: Identifying the issues
dc.typebook chapter


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