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dc.contributor.authorHawtin, Geoffrey
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-22T14:21:42Z
dc.date.available2017-05-22T14:21:42Z
dc.date.issued1997
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/49867
dc.description.abstractBiotechnology has opened up enormous and exciting possibilities for plant breeding. The development of varieties with resistance or tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses or with new characteristics of interest to consumers, could make a substantial contribution to increasing productivity and alleviating poverty in a sustainable way. But, the reduction of publicly funded research and the growing concentration of biotechnological expertise in the private sector have aroused fears that the poorest segments of society will be neglected and will not share in the potential benefits that the new technologies could bring to their lives.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNABC
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectAgricultural biotechnology
dc.subjectenvironment
dc.subjectsustainable agriculture
dc.subjectdrought tolerance
dc.subjectheat tolerance
dc.subjectpesticides
dc.subjectinternational agriculture
dc.subjectfeeding the world
dc.subjectproperty rights
dc.subjectpublic funding of research
dc.subject
dc.titleBiotechnology in the maintenance and use of crop genetic diversity
dc.typebook chapter


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