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dc.contributor.authorClark, John Bell
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-17T19:28:31Z
dc.date.available2017-05-17T19:28:31Z
dc.date.issued1994
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/49788
dc.description.abstractEven if genetic engineering does not lead to unforeseen mutations and runaway alien varieties, the disruptions to balances in nature are predictable— a genetic characteristic always results in an end product or products in the organism, substances which nature assimilates gradually over time. By natural selection, nature eliminates its mistakes. Without allowing for natural corrections, biotechnology places us above nature.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNABC
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectAgricutural biotechnology
dc.subjectpublic good
dc.subjectdeloping nations
dc.subjecttechnology transfer
dc.subjectgovernment regulation
dc.subjectglobal population
dc.subject
dc.titleGenetic engineering (“Biotech”): use of science gone wrong
dc.typebook chapter


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