Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBatie, Sandra S.
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-17T19:28:31Z
dc.date.available2017-05-17T19:28:31Z
dc.date.issued1994
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/49787
dc.description.abstractMuch of the debate about biotechnology and the environment is not so much about the nature and magnitude of the risk, but rather, who should bear the costs if a course of action proves to be in error. Should biotechnology products be readily approved for use, placing the burden of error on the environment? Or should the products be very cautiously screened, placing the bur-den of error on the inventors and users of the product?
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNABC
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectAgricutural biotechnology
dc.subjectpublic good
dc.subjectdeloping nations
dc.subjecttechnology transfer
dc.subjectgovernment regulation
dc.subjectglobal population
dc.subject
dc.titleBiotechnology and the environment
dc.typebook chapter


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International

Statistics