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dc.contributor.authorCaulder, Jeffrey
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-16T15:47:36Z
dc.date.available2017-05-16T15:47:36Z
dc.date.issued1991
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/49698
dc.description.abstractWithout public acceptance, the applications of genetic engineering may be regulated out of existence. The long regulatory cycles will crush smaller biotechnology companies, and focus on a few large companies who have the funding and time to wait out the regulatory storm. Scientists and informed lay people must emphasize to the public that genetic engineering is engineering is a method to hybridize different organisms, to graft one or several genes from one organism to another. The plant and animal breeder has a limited number of useful traits—genes—with which to work into his crop seeds and animals. Genetic engineering offers a much larger menu of potentially useful traits and can enormously speed up the process of hybridization.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNABC
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectAgricultural biotechnology
dc.subjectenvironment
dc.subjectresearch funding
dc.subjectfamily farm
dc.subjectcorporate farm
dc.subjectregulation
dc.subjectsustainable agriculture
dc.subjecttransgenic products
dc.subjectfield trials
dc.subjectpatenting
dc.subjectintellectual property
dc.subjectwatere quality
dc.subjectherbicide tolerance, growth promotants
dc.subject
dc.titleBiotechnology at the forefront of agriculture
dc.typebook chapter


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