Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRosch, Justin George
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-04T20:27:59Z
dc.date.available2017-04-04T20:27:59Z
dc.date.issued2017-01-30
dc.identifier.otherRosch_cornellgrad_0058F_10160
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/cornellgrad:10160
dc.identifier.otherbibid: 9906085
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/47838
dc.description.abstractA method for circumventing the blood-brain barrier (BBB), called convection-enhanced delivery (CED), involves directly infusing therapeutics into the brain tissue. The behavior of the therapeutics once in the tissue is not well understood. To gain insight into the behavior of materials introduced into the brain during a CED-like infusion, we used two-photon fluorescence microscopy to observe infusate movement in vivo. With our experiments, we were able to sample the infusate volume with high temporal (~30 s volume sample) and spatial (~2.5 µm3 voxel size) resolution. With observable locations of the infused materials at many time points throughout the infusion, we determined important position, velocity, and volume characteristics of each infusion. For smaller, less-rigid materials, we saw larger distribution volume relative to larger, more-rigid materials. Furthermore, we were able to directly observe materials entering and traveling in the perivascular spaces (PVS), which are thin annular regions surrounding blood vessels in the brain. PVS are believed to be important in a number of neurological disorders and neural homeostasis, and we have shown that they play an influential role in the movement of infused materials. For a given timepoint in an infusion, the average PVS occupancy of infused materials can be a large portion of the total volume observed, depending on the location of an available space relative to the infusion needle outlet. Given the large amount of infused material entering the PVS, we theorize how this knowledge can be used to influence clinical treatments of neurological disorders in order to have better control of where the infused materials will go during different parts of an infusion.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectChemical engineering
dc.subjectBiomedical engineering
dc.titleTRANSPORT IN THE PERIVASCULAR SPACES OF THE BRAIN: VISUALIZATION OF CONVECTION-ENHANCED DELIVERY
dc.typedissertation or thesis
thesis.degree.disciplineChemical Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorCornell University
thesis.degree.levelDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.namePh. D., Chemical Engineering
dc.contributor.chairOlbricht, William Lee
dc.contributor.committeeMemberSchaffer, Chris
dc.contributor.committeeMemberKing, Michael R.
dcterms.licensehttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/59810
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.7298/X4PR7SZS


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Statistics