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dc.contributor.authorSmith, Donald F.
dc.contributor.authorKumble, Julie
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-31T18:32:36Z
dc.date.available2017-01-31T18:32:36Z
dc.date.issued2014-02-10
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/46080
dc.description.abstractThis profile tells the story of how Dr. Andrea Dennis-LaVigne, an African-American woman Tuskegee-educated veterinarian, had done her homework and opened a hospital in 1992 in what was referred to as a new American City, an integrated city where people of different race, ethnicity, and sexual orientation could come to an animal hospital and know that their pets would be cared for without judgment.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherCornell University College of Veterinary Medicine
dc.subjectHistory of Veterinary Medicine
dc.subjectTuskegee University
dc.subjectUniversity of Connecticut
dc.subjectDennis-LaVigne, Andrea
dc.subjectBloomfield Animal Hospital
dc.subjectMentors
dc.subjectBowie, Walter C.
dc.subjectRoss University
dc.subjectUniversity of California-Davis
dc.subjectPractice Owner
dc.subjectDiversity
dc.subjectAfrican-American Veterinarian
dc.subjectLaVigne, Randy
dc.subjectCeranowicz, Eva
dc.subjectJacobson, Linda
dc.subjectCohn, Theodore
dc.subjectWomen in Veterinary Medicine
dc.subjectWomen Leadership in Veterinary Medicine
dc.subjectBlack History Month
dc.titleA Tuskegee Graduate to Lead the Connecticut Veterinary Medical Association
dc.typearticle


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