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dc.contributor.authorSmith, Donald F.
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-31T18:11:05Z
dc.date.available2017-01-31T18:11:05Z
dc.date.issued2013-06-13
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/46006
dc.description.abstractFifty years ago, during an era when it was common for women veterinarians and physicians to adopt their husbands’ names when marrying, some students did not change their names. Not all name change stories deal with gender. In addition, during the early decades of the 20th century, it was relatively common for Jewish students or veterinarians to change their names to make them sound less ethnic.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherCornell University College of Veterinary Medicine
dc.subjectHistory of Veterinary Medicine
dc.subjectWomen in Veterinary Medicine
dc.subjectJewish Veterinarians
dc.subjectAnti-Semitism
dc.subjectName Change
dc.subjectHerr, Donald M., Thomson, Patricia
dc.subjectHerr, Patrician Thomson
dc.subjectFallon, Harry
dc.subjectGoldhaft, Tevis
dc.subjectGilbert, Edwin O.
dc.subjectGoldberg, Samuel
dc.subjectSmith, Debra A.
dc.titleWhat's In a Name?
dc.typearticle


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