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dc.contributor.authorSmith, Jansen
dc.contributor.authorStephen R. Durham
dc.contributor.authorGregory P. Dietl
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-13T20:07:03Z
dc.date.available2016-10-13T20:07:03Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/44717
dc.descriptionIf you would like to use these data you are welcome to do so. We request that you cite our work as follows: Smith, J.A., Durham, S.R., & Dietl, G.P. 2017. Conceptions of long-term data among marine conservation biologists and what conservation paleobiologists need to know, In: Marine Conservation Paleobiology (Topics in Geobiology). Springer Verlag, New York. Tyler, C.L., Schneider, C.L. (eds).
dc.description.abstractMarine conservation biologists increasingly recognize the value of long-term data and the temporal context they can provide for modern ecosystems. Such data are also available from conservation paleobiology, but the enormous potential for integration of geohistorical data in marine conservation biology remains unrealized. The lack of a common language for data integration and a tendency in each field to measure different variables, at scales that may differ by orders of magnitude, make integration difficult. To better understand how conservation paleobiology can maximize its potential, we conducted a survey of marine conservation biologists working in the United States. The respondent population included 90 marine conservation biologists from a variety of workplaces (e.g., governmental, academic) and experience levels (<5 years to >25 years). Survey responses indicated that our fields share common conservation goals (e.g., conservation of biodiversity and ecosystem services) and use long-term data in similar ways (e.g., to establish baselines and elucidate trends and patterns). Respondents, however, mostly considered “long term” to refer to decadal timescales and rarely mentioned geohistorical data. Overall, the survey results suggest conservation paleobiologists have much work to do before geohistorical data are regularly accepted and applied in marine conservation biology. We highlight four takeaways from the results of our survey that can help conservation paleobiologists integrate their data into marine conservation practice. 1) Conservation paleobiologists must improve their communication with marine conservation biologists inside and outside of academia. 2) One of the most promising areas for integration is investigating climate change and its ecological implications. 3) The types of long-term data that marine conservation biologists want and need are deliverables conservation paleobiologists can provide. 4) Conservation paleobiologists must be proactive in addressing the barriers that hinder the application of long-term data in conservation practice.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbySmith, J.A., Durham, S.R., & Dietl, G.P. 2017. Conceptions of long-term data among marine conservation biologists and what conservation paleobiologists need to know, In: Marine Conservation Paleobiology (Topics in Geobiology). Springer Verlag, New York. Tyler, C.L., Schneider, C.L. (eds).en_US
dc.subjectcommunication
dc.subjectdata integration
dc.subjectenvironmental stressors
dc.subjectgeohistorical data
dc.titleData from: Conceptions of long-term data among marine conservation biologists and what conservation paleobiologists need to know
dc.typedataseten_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.7298/X4VM4965en-US


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