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dc.contributor.authorTomaselli, Joyce deVries
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-20T17:29:16Z
dc.date.available2016-06-20T17:29:16Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/44241
dc.description.abstractCompost encourages healthy and balanced populations of soil organisms that can suppress plant pathogens by parasitizing them, or out competing them for food and water. The composting of garden, landscape and weed residuals also has the potential to destroy many serious plant pathogens and weed seeds. This project developed and piloted a two-day compost training for Hudson Valley CCE educators and Master Gardener Volunteers (MGV) to enhance the understanding and communication of best practices in composting and amending soil with compost to promote plant health and preventative pest management, and maximize their successful adoption in IPM strategies. IPM information such as rodent management and composting invasive species or diseased plants was included.
dc.language.isoother
dc.publisherNew York State IPM Program
dc.subjectCommunity IPM
dc.subjectGardening
dc.subject
dc.titleAdding Compost as a Successful Strategy in CCE Master Gardener Volunteer’s IPM Toolbox
dc.typereport


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