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dc.contributor.authorWaldron, J. Keith
dc.contributor.authorStanyard, M.
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-14T19:53:12Z
dc.date.available2016-03-14T19:53:12Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/42935
dc.description.abstractUSDA estimates suggest that producers may loose as much as 10% of the grain crop from the time of harvest until the grain is fed or processed. Much attention has been placed on IPM education for individuals producing field corn, soybeans, wheat and other field/cash crop commodities. Unfortunately, few Integrated Pest Management (IPM) educational opportunities have been available to producers in the northeast for protecting these commodities while stored on-farm. IPM training would help producers minimize or avoid common stored product management problems. A modest potential gain (of 1%) due to improved pest management could have a significant positive economic impact on overall profitability. Enhanced pest management of commodity grains stored on-farm would directly benefit individual growers. These improvements would help ensure a quality product entering the overall grain commodity stream resulting in better grain protection and economic benefits to local and regional grain mills and food processing industries.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNew York State IPM Program
dc.subjectAgricultural IPM
dc.subjectField Corn
dc.subjectSoybeans
dc.subjectWheat
dc.subjectField Crops
dc.titleStored Grain IPM: Practical Information and Experience for On-Farm Storage Practitioners
dc.typereport


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