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dc.contributor.authorCarroll, Juliet
dc.contributor.authorMarks, Michelle
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-14T16:33:49Z
dc.date.available2016-03-14T16:33:49Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/42880
dc.descriptionNYS IPM Type: Invasive and Exotic Fact Sheet
dc.descriptionAccess to earlier versions of this document restricted upon request of the submitter. A newer version is available.
dc.description.abstractIncreased global trade facilitates the movement of invasive pests like the false codling moth. Native to sub-Saharan Africa, false codling moth can be transported to the U.S. via cargo and passenger luggage—the transport of fresh produce being the most significant risk. In 2008, a single male moth was trapped in Ventura County, California, which marked the first domestic detection of this pest, though it is not established there.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNew York State IPM Program
dc.relation.isreplacedbyhttp://hdl.handle.net/1813/42880.2
dc.subjectAgricultural IPM
dc.subjectFruits
dc.subjectTree Fruit
dc.subjectPeaches and Nectarines
dc.subjectPlums
dc.subjectField Corn
dc.subjectSweet Corn
dc.titleFalse Codling Moth
dc.typefact sheet


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