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dc.contributor.authorGangloff-Kaufmann, Jody
dc.contributor.authorBraband, Lynn
dc.contributor.authorFrye, Matthew
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-01T13:16:50Z
dc.date.available2016-03-01T13:16:50Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/42507
dc.description.abstractIn the past 15 years, bed bugs have made an astounding comeback all across the United States. Bed bugs are small blood-feeding insects that invade human habitats, specifically homes, and thrive in places where people sleep. Since bed bugs were nearly absent for 40 years in the US, very little was known about their biology and current level of pesticide tolerance. In 2010 the news media focused great attention on bed bugs, which increased the public’s familiarity with this pest. However, educational needs for dealing with bed bugs are still overwhelming, and include outreach to cooperative extension educators, Master Gardeners, pest control professionals, facilities managers, social workers, medical professionals, travelers, college students and their families, landlords, tenants of rented properties, and just about everyone else. The people most vulnerable to bed bugs are those in multiple unit buildings, the elderly (often living alone), and those living in assisted or group homes. Elderly, disabled and disadvantaged individuals who have fewer resources and sometimes lack the capacity to recognize or deal with bed bugs are more commonly living with bed bugs.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNew York State IPM Program
dc.subjectCommunity IPM
dc.subjectHumans or Pets
dc.subjectBedbugs
dc.titleBed Bug Outreach Efforts for 2012
dc.typereport


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