Now showing items 1-20 of 25

    • American Plum Borer 

      Kain, David P.; Agnello, Arthur M. (New York State IPM Program, 1997)
      The American plum borer (APB) is a cambium-feeding moth pest of fruit and ornamental trees. It is unusual because it belongs to the pyralid, rather than the sesiid (clearwing) family, which is more commonly associated with ...
    • Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus 

      Cieniewicz, Elizabeth; Fuchs, Marc (New York State IPM Program, 2016)
      Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (ACLSV) infects pome and stone fruits. It can elicit diverse symptoms although, in most cultivars the virus is latent, which means that infected trees do not manifest observable symptoms. ...
    • Apple Proliferation Phytoplasma 

      Carroll, Juliet; Marks, Michelle (New York State IPM Program, 2018)
      The organism responsible for this disease of apples, stone fruits, and other perennial fruit trees is a phytoplasma: a very small bacterium lacking a cell wall and enclosed in a single membrane. Inhabiting primarily the ...
    • Apple-Boring Beetles 

      Agnello, Arthur M. (New York State IPM Program, 1999)
      Although the number of wood-boring beetles attacking fruit trees is relatively small and their infestations are sporadic, four species found in New York are capable of seriously damaging or killing trees. They differ some ...
    • Asiatic Brown Rot 

      Carroll, Juliet; Marks, Michelle (New York State IPM Program, 2018)
      Asiatic brown rot, caused by the fungus Monilia polystroma, is native to Japan. Unlike our native brown rot which infects primarily stone fruit, Asiatic brown rot readily infects apple and pear. Asiatic brown rot has been ...
    • Black Knot of Plums 

      Wilcox, Wayne F. (New York State IPM Program, 1992)
      Black knot is a common and often serious disease of plum and prune trees in New York. Once established, the disease becomes progressively more severe each year unless control measures are taken. Infected limbs and twigs ...
    • Brown Rot of Stone and Pome Fruit 

      Strickland, David; Carroll, Juliet; Cox, Kerik (New York State IPM Program, 2019)
      Brown rot occurs on all stone fruit worldwide and afflicts blossoms, twigs, and fruit, both pre- and post-harvest. Several closely-related fungal species, collectively known as Monilinia spp. cause the disease. In stone ...
    • Cherry Bark Tortrix Moth 

      Carroll, Juliet; Della Rosa, Linda (New York State IPM Program, 2018)
      A relatively new exotic pest in North America, cherry bark tortrix was found in British Columbia in 1989, in Washington in 1991, spread to Oregon, and has now established itself as a pest of ornamental cherries in the ...
    • Disease and Insect Resistant Ornamental Plants: Prunus (Prunus) 

      Thurn, Mary; Lamb, Elizabeth; Eshenaur, Brian (New York State Integrated Pest Management Program, 2019)
      Prunus is a large genus of over 400 species and hybrids in the rose family which includes apricots, nectarines, peaches, cherries, plums and almonds. Stone fruit trees are important agricultural crops, but many are also ...
    • Dogwood Borer 

      A. Seaman, A.; Riedl, H.; Cummins, J. (New York State IPM Program, 1985)
      The dogwood borer (DWB), a native clearwing moth, can be found from southeastern Canada to Florida, and as far west as the Mississippi. The insect has a wide host range including dogwood, pecan, oak, plum, and apple. The ...
    • European Red Mite 

      Lienk, S.E. (New York State IPM Program, 1980)
      The European red mite (ERM) is a European species introduced to North America in the early 1900’s. It rapidly extended its range, and is now established in most deciduous fruit growing areas. It is the most important mite ...
    • False Codling Moth 

      Carroll, Juliet; Marks, Michelle (New York State IPM Program, 2018)
      Increased global trade facilitates the movement of invasive pests like the false codling moth. Native to sub-Saharan Africa, false codling moth can be transported to the U.S. via cargo and passenger luggage—the transport ...
    • Obliquebanded Leafroller 

      Reissig, W.H. (New York State IPM Program, 1980)
      The obliquebanded leafroller (OBLR) is native to and widely distributed throughout temperate North America. Larvae feed on a wide range of plants; members of the rose family are their preferred hosts. OBLR outbreaks have ...
    • Oriental Fruit Moth 

      A. Seaman, A.; Riedl, H. (New York State IPM Program, 1988)
      The Oriental fruit moth (OFM), native to China, was introduced to the United States from Japan about 1913 on infested nursery stock. The OFM is now found in all regions of North America where peaches are grown. Although ...
    • Peachtree Borer 

      Lienk, S.E. (New York State IPM Program, 1980)
      The peachtree borer (PTB), a native insect, is a major pest of stone fruits in the United States and Canada. Prior to the introduction of the peach, it lived on native wild cherries and plums. The majority of PTB have a ...
    • Perennial Canker 

      Wilcox, Wayne F. (New York State IPM Program, 1995)
      Perennial canker (also called Valsa canker, Cytospora canker, Leucostoma canker, and peach canker) is one of the most common and debilitating diseases of peach trees in the Northeast. It also occurs regularly on sweet ...
    • Plum Curculio 

      Lienk, S.E. (New York State IPM Program, 1980)
      The plum curculio (PC), a native of North America, is a major pest of pome and stone fruits in the United States and Canada east of the 1 DOth meridian. The PC has a single generation in most areas but may have a partial ...
    • Plum Pox Disease of Stone Fruits 

      Fuchs, Marc; Cox, Rosemary; Cox, Kerik (New York State IPM Program, 2008)
      Plum pox is a viral disease of stone fruits first reported in Bulgarian plums in the 1910’s. More widely known around the world by its Slavic name, sharka, the disease first spread slowly through eastern Europe, gaining ...
    • Redbanded Leafroller 

      Spangler, Steve M.; Agnello, Arthur (New York State IPM Program, 1989)
      The redbanded leafroller (RBLR) has been reported to feed on apple since the 1870s, but was not found to be an economic pest of commercial apples in northeastern United States until1918. It remained a minor pest until the ...
    • Spotted Lanternfly 

      Carroll, Juliet; Mattoon, Nicole (New York State Integrated Pest Management Program, 2018)
      The spotted lanternfly, also known as Chinese blistering cicada, is a planthopper native to China and Southeastern Asia. Discovered in Pennsylvania in 2014, the spotted lanternfly presents a threat to both woody and non-woody ...