Now showing items 1-20 of 51

    • A New York State Oak Wilt Project: a few discoveries made and lessons learned 

      Snover-Clift, Karen (Cornell University Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, 2017-06-02)
      This article reviews the work involved in a recently completed Specialty Crop Block Grant project focusing on surveying for the oak wilt pathogen (with our NYS Department of Environmental Conservation [NYSDEC] collaborators) ...
    • Amelanchier Ailments 

      Dailey O'Brien, Dawn (Cornell University Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, 2016-04-15)
      Amelanchiers are in the rose family (Rosaceae) and therefore subject to many of the common insect and disease problems of other ornamentals in that family (ex. crabapple, hawthorn, mountain-ash, etc.) including Entomosporium ...
    • American Chestnut: Blight and the Resurrection of a Mighty Giant 

      Kenaley, Shawn (Cornell University Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, 2013-06-14)
      The chestnut blight fungus, Cryphonectria parasitica, is a canker pathogen capable of colonizing wounds created by self-pruning, winter injury, insects, woodland mammals, and mechanical injuries that expose the inner bark. ...
    • An Update on Invasive Adelgids in New York 

      Whitmore, Mark (Cornell University Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, 2017-08-11)
      The Hemlock Woolly Adelgid, Adelges tsugae (HWA) and Balsam Woolly Adelgid, Adelges piceae (BWA) are originally from Japan and the Caucasian Mountains respectively, and have become huge problems because they left their ...
    • An Update on the Emerald Ash Borer in New York: Part 1 

      Whitmore, Mark (Cornell University Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, 2013-06-28)
      The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, is quickly developing into the most significant forest pest to hit New York since the Chestnut blight. EAB has been spreading in New York and it is important for anyone ...
    • Asian Gypsy Moth Revisited 

      Dailey O'Brien, Dawn; Hudler, George (Cornell University Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, 2012-07-20)
      Asian gypsy moths are closely related to the “normal” European gypsy moth but with a broader host range and much more mobile females. The two “strains” look so much alike that the only way to conclusively distinguish them ...
    • Asian Longhorned Beetles Continue to Bug Us! 

      Goble, Tarryn (Cornell University Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, 2014-04-18)
    • Beech Canker Disease Update 

      Hudler, George (Cornell University Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, 2012-06-29)
      An update on Dr. George Hudler’s work with bleeding cankers on European beech.
    • Black Oak Gall Wasp? A Threat in Southeastern NY & New England 

      Gilrein, Dan (Cornell University Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, 2014-07-18)
      Black oak trees around Long Island, in parts of Rhode Island, eastern Massachusetts and eastern NJ have been plagued by a gall wasp that has caused severe damage to twigs. In some cases repeat attacks over the last few ...
    • Boxed In 

      Gilrein, Dan (Cornell University Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, 2014-04-04)
      In addition to serious disease boxwood blight, there are other kinds of usually relatively minor or less serious problems of boxwood including insect, mite, disease and cultural or environmental problems. Some of the insects ...
    • Boxwood Blight: New Disease Is On the Move 

      Daughtrey, Margery (Cornell University Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, 2013-04-05)
      Boxwood blight, caused by the fungus Calonectria pseudonaviculata (also known as Cylindrocladium buxicola or C. pseudonaviculata) was first detected in the New York state in December of 2012, from samples in Westchester, ...
    • Butternut Decline: A Refreshing Ray of Hope 

      Hudler, George (Cornell University Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, 2015-07-17)
      Butternut canker, an apparently exotic disease of uncertain geographic origin, is central to the decline of the species. The causal organism is a fungus?-?Sirococcus clavigignenti-juglandacearum?-?and its most damaging ...
    • C Lateblight Simulation 

      Fry, W. E.; Milgroom, M. G.; Doster, M. A.; Bruhn, J. A.; Bruck, R. I.; Ticknor, Barr; Arneson, Phil (1991)
    • C Resistan Simulation 

      Arneson, Phil; Ticknor, Barr (1992)
    • Common Euonymus Pest Problems 

      Dailey O'Brien, Dawn (Cornell University Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, 2014-06-27)
      In some areas, the overuse of Euonymus species has resulted in mono-cultures of plants highly susceptible to attack by opportunistic insects or diseases. Some of the most common euonymus pests seen when scouting include ...
    • Consumer ‘Extended Weed Control’ Products: Nothing is Foolproof! 

      Senesac, Andy (Cornell University Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, 2016-07-15)
      The study evaluated four ready-to-use products available to homeowners that offer postemergence weed control and additional ‘extended control’. In the study these extended control products were applied to the base of four ...
    • Doggone Insect Pests of Dogwood! 

      Dailey O'Brien, Dawn (Cornell University Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, 2015-06-26)
      Three key insect pests of the tree and shrub forms of dogwoods (Cornus sp.) include dogwood borer, the dogwood sawfly and cottony maple leaf scale. Signs, symptoms, life history and management of each are covered.
    • Douglas-Fir Needlecast Management 

      Eshenaur, Brian (Cornell University Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, 2017-06-30)
      Douglas-firs have recently fallen out of favor due to widespread and persistent problems with needlecast diseases which lead to needle discoloration and sparse foliage. Whether in the landscape, nursery or at Christmas ...
    • European Beech “Summit” at Longwood Gardens 

      Hudler, George (Cornell University Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, 2013-05-03)
      European beech issues such as Phytophthora species, ambrosia beetles, bleeding cankers, abiotic stress are reviewed.
    • Exotic Threats: Oak Splendor Beetle & Siberian Silk Moth 

      McCarthy, Rachel (Cornell University Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, 2015-05-01)
      This article highlights two pests on USDA’s watch list-Oak Splendor Beetle (Agrilus biguttatus), a borer that could prove difficult to find?and Siberian Silk Moth (Dendrolimus sibiricus), a defoliator-that could be easy ...