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dc.contributor.authorSeybert, Luciaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-22T14:16:12Z
dc.date.available2017-09-26T06:00:49Z
dc.date.issued2012-05-27en_US
dc.identifier.otherbibid: 8251330
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/31455
dc.description.abstractWhy do some norms make international advances more easily than others? What do nuclear safety and human rights have in common? Norms do not simply spread, they are adopted by governments and internalized by societies and while both steps are necessary for norm promotion, neither is sufficient. My argument disputes the dichotomy implicit in existing literature between "enlightened" civil society and norm-violating governments and suggests that often the roles are reversed. I also challenge the notion that once norms reach the international realm, their evolution stops. I test the theory by applying it to the 2004 enlargement of the European Union (EU), in which policies were presented to the acceding Eastern European states in a non-negotiable package deal. The primary, and contrasting case studies are in nuclear safety and ethnic minority rights, both of which have met only intermittent success but each for different reasons. The dissertation combines two levels of comparison - between norm types and across countries (Lithuania, Slovakia, Czech Republic). I use a mix of quantitative (computer-assisted text analysis, factor analysis) and qualitative methods. In terms of boarder impact, the project develops the norm promotion angle to assess the legitimacy of conditionality arrangements, which international institutions impose on divided and relatively resource-poor societies.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectinternational normsen_US
dc.subjectEU englargementen_US
dc.subjectminority rightsen_US
dc.subjectnuclear safetyen_US
dc.subjectSlovakiaen_US
dc.subjectLithuaniaen_US
dc.subjectCzech Republicen_US
dc.titleThe Trouble With "Returning To Europe": New European Union Members' Reluctant Embrace Of Nuclear Safety And Minority Rightsen_US
dc.typedissertation or thesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGovernment
thesis.degree.grantorCornell Universityen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.namePh. D., Government
dc.contributor.chairKatzenstein, Peter Joachimen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberEvangelista, Matthew Anthonyen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBunce, Valerie Janeen_US


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