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dc.contributor.authorGroenevelt, Pieter H.
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-20T18:04:20Z
dc.date.available2012-07-20T18:04:20Z
dc.date.issued2012-05
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/29572
dc.descriptionOnce downloaded, these high definition QuickTime videos may be played using a computer video player with H.264 codec, 1280x720 pixels, millions of colors, AAC audio at 44100Hz and 29.97 frames per second. The data rate is 5Mbps. File sizes are on the order of 600-900 MB. (Other formats may be added later.) Free QuickTime players for Macintosh and Window computers may be located using a Google search on QuickTime. The DVD was produced by J. Robert Cooke.en_US
dc.description.abstractQ. What is the driving force that lifts buildings, pipelines and roads into the air when the soil underneath freezes? A. Ask Clapeyron……A unifying theory is proposed, bringing together the CRRELL School of Duwayne Anderson and the CORNELL School of Bob Miller, leading to the definition of a Heave Index for the sensitivity of soils to exhibit frost heave. While traveling through the Northern parts of Idaho and Montana with my colleagues, Wilco van Loon (left) and Ed Perfect (right), we were warned about the hazards of freezing soilen_US
dc.publisherInternet-First University Pressen_US
dc.subjectFreezing soilen_US
dc.subjectHeaving pressureen_US
dc.subjectHeave rateen_US
dc.subjectSegregation Potentialen_US
dc.subjectClapeyronen_US
dc.subjectHeave Indexen_US
dc.titleH2. Hot Thermodynamics for Frozen Soilsen_US
dc.typevideo/moving imageen_US
dc.description.viewer1_gmzgv13len_US


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