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dc.contributor.authorSenk, Sarahen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-28T20:57:36Z
dc.date.available2016-09-29T05:36:49Z
dc.date.issued2011-05-31en_US
dc.identifier.otherbibid: 7745402
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/29484
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation takes issue with recent injunctions against mourning in contemporary trauma studies. The critical turn to melancholic or "resistant mourning" is based on the idea that one normalizes and assimilates loss in ethically dubious ways, either denying the loss or denying the alterity of the lost other; as a result, this criticism positions melancholia as the only viable response against a totalizing mourning. In tracing the parallels between this trend and a related valorization of anti-elegiac tendencies in twentieth and twenty-first century writing, I argue that the resurgent discourse of melancholia is based on a perceived breakdown of mourning which paradoxically conceals a desire for a time of perfect, totalizing mourning that this trend ostensibly refutes. This thesis, which most centrally addresses recent trends in trauma studies, opens up to postcolonial studies by examining how contemporary Anglophone writers, shaped by a common traumatic history of English colonialism, attempt to articulate new modes of grief work rather than simply returning to old wounds. Focusing on representations of individual loss and historical trauma in the work of Kamau Brathwaite, J. M. Coetzee, Zakes Mda, and Derek Walcott, I explore acts of literature as ways of working-through that do not actually foreclose a dialogic relationship with the past. While all four writers initially seem to participate in a valorization of melancholia, they are actually attempting to work through loss in ways that challenge a reductive binary opposition between mourning as closure and melancholia as openness.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectTrauma Studiesen_US
dc.subjectMourningen_US
dc.subjectMelancholiaen_US
dc.subjectCaribbeanen_US
dc.subjectSouth Africaen_US
dc.titleOriginal Skin: Melancholy Returns, Postcolonial Mourningen_US
dc.typedissertation or thesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineComparative Literature
thesis.degree.grantorCornell Universityen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.namePh. D., Comparative Literature
dc.contributor.chairMonroe, Jonathan Becken_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberLacapra, Dominick Cen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberDeloughrey, Elizabeth M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberCastillo, Debra Annen_US


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