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dc.contributor.authorStone, Heather M.
dc.contributor.authorSnedeker, Suzanne M.
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-08T16:34:23Z
dc.date.available2010-02-08T16:34:23Z
dc.date.issued2009-03
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/14406
dc.descriptionHandout on alternatives to products with environmental estrogens and how to recycle productsen_US
dc.description.abstractThis handout is a Resource Guide on alternatives to products that contain environmental estrogens. This includes alternatives to bisphenol-A (BPA), and how to choose detergents that do not contain estrogenic ingredients. It also provides links to resources on how to recycle electronics that may contain heavy metals that are known to be estrogenic. Researchers are concerned that low levels of environmental estrogens can work with the body's own estrogen to increase the risk of breast cancer. Keeping environmental estrogen out of our common environment is important to reduce exposure and reduce health risks.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNew York State Department of Healthen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCornell University Program Breast Cancer and Environmental Risk Factorsen_US
dc.subjectenvironmental estrogenen_US
dc.subjectestrogenen_US
dc.subjectbreast canceren_US
dc.subjecthormoneen_US
dc.subjectrecyclingen_US
dc.subjectalternativesen_US
dc.subjecteCyclingen_US
dc.subjectstainless steel containersen_US
dc.subjectdetergentsen_US
dc.subjectdish soapen_US
dc.subjectbisphenol-Aen_US
dc.subjectBPAen_US
dc.subjectheavy metalsen_US
dc.titleBreast Cancer and The Estrogen Connection; Resource Guide on Alternatives and Recyling, Environmental Estrogens in Everyday Productsen_US
dc.title.alternativeResource Guide on Alternatives and Recycling, Environmental Estrogens in Everyday Productsen_US
dc.typefact sheeten_US


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