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dc.contributor.authorChautá, Alexander
dc.contributor.authorKumar, Arvind
dc.contributor.authorMejia, Jessica
dc.contributor.authorStashenko, Elena
dc.contributor.authorKessler, Andre
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-03T17:39:49Z
dc.date.available2022-08-03T17:39:49Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationTBDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/111390
dc.descriptionThis dataset includes results from HPLC and GC-MS analyses on the non-volatile and volatile secondary metabolites of B. resinosa. The data are raw signal intensity and signal intensity of each compound relative to an internal standard. The data were the basis for the analyses in the original publication and can be used for subsequent analyses after informing the original authors.en_US
dc.description.abstractStickiness of vegetative tissues has evolved multiple times in different plant families but is rare and understudied in flowers. While stickiness in general is thought to function primarily as a defense against herbivores, it can compromise mutualistic interactions (such as those with pollinators) in reproductive tissues. Here, we test the hypothesis that stickiness on flower petals of the High-Andean plant, Bejaria resinosa (Ericaceae), functions as a defense against florivores. We address ecological consequences and discuss potential trade-offs associated with a repellant trait expressed in flowers that mediate mutualistic interactions. In surveys and manipulative experiments, we assess florivory and resulting fitness effects on plants with sticky and non-sticky flowers in different native populations of B. resinosa in Colombia. In addition, we analyze the volatile and non-volatile components in sticky and non-sticky flower morphs to understand the chemical information context within which stickiness is expressed. We demonstrate that fruit set is strongly affected by floral stickiness but also varies with population. While identifying floral stickiness as a major defensive function, our data also suggest that the context-dependency of chemical defense functionality likely arises from differential availability of primary pollinators and potential trade-offs between chemical defense with different modes of action.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe research was funded by a grant to AC by Fundación CEIBA (Centro de Estudios Interdisciplinarios Básicos y Aplicados) and a grant from the New Phytologist Foundation to AK.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherTBDen_US
dc.relation.hasversionRaw Data associated with original publicationen_US
dc.rightsCC0 1.0 Universal*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/*
dc.subjectecological conflictsen_US
dc.subjectindirect defensesen_US
dc.subjectplant defenseen_US
dc.subjectpollinationen_US
dc.subjectprotocarnivoryen_US
dc.subjectsecondary metabolitesen_US
dc.titleDEFENSIVE FUNCTIONS AND POTENTIAL ECOLOGICAL CONFLICTS OF FLORAL STICKINESSen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.typedataseten_US
schema.accessibilityFeaturealternativeTexten_US
schema.accessibilityHazardnoneen_US
schema.accessibilitySummaryData are accessible once the original paper has been publisheden_US


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