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dc.contributor.authorPossinger, Angela R.
dc.contributor.authorZachman, Michael J.
dc.contributor.authorDynes, James J.
dc.contributor.authorRegier, Tom Z.
dc.contributor.authorKourkoutis, Lena F.
dc.contributor.authorLehmann, Johannes
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-24T20:01:45Z
dc.date.available2021-09-24T20:01:45Z
dc.date.issued2021-09-24
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/109997
dc.descriptionPlease cite as: Angela R. Possinger, Michael J. Zachman, James J. Dynes, Tom Z. Regier, Lena F. Kourkoutis, Johannes Lehmann. (2021) Data From: Co-precipitation Induces Changes to Iron and Carbon Chemistry and Spatial Distribution at the Nanometer Scale. [dataset] Cornell University eCommons Repository. https://doi.org/10.7298/6134-h423en_US
dc.description.abstractData in support of research on: Association of organic matter (OM) with mineral phases via co-precipitation is expected to be a widespread process in environments with high OM input and frequent mineral dissolution and re-precipitation. In contrast to surface area-limited adsorption processes, co-precipitation may allow for greater carbon (C) accumulation. However, the potential sub-micrometer scale structural and compositional differences that affect the bioavailability of co-precipitated C are largely unknown. In this study, we used a combination of high-resolution analytical electron microscopy and bulk spectroscopy to probe interactions between a mineral phase (ferrihydrite, nominally Fe2O3•0.5H2O) and organic soil-derived water-extractable OM (WEOM). In co-precipitated WEOM-Fe, nanometer-scale scanning transmission electron microscopy with electron energy loss spectroscopy (STEM-EELS) revealed increased Fe(II) and less Fe aggregation relative to adsorbed WEOM-Fe. Spatially distinct lower- and higher-energy C regions were detected in both adsorbed and co-precipitated WEOM-Fe. In co-precipitates, lower-energy aromatic and/or substituted aromatic C was spatially associated with reduced Fe(II), but higher-energy oxidized C was enriched at the oxidized Fe(III) interface. Therefore, we show that co-precipitation does not constitute a non-specific physical encapsulation of C that only affects Fe chemistry and spatial distribution, but may cause a bi-directional set of reactions that lead to spatial separation and transformation of both Fe and C forms. In particular, we propose that abiotic redox reactions between Fe and C via substituted aromatic groups (e.g., hydroquinones) play a role in creating distinct co-precipitate composition, with potential implications for its mineralization.
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding for this study was provided by the NSF IGERT in Cross-Scale Biogeochemistry and Climate at Cornell University (NSF Award #1069193) and the Technical University of Munich Institute for Advanced Studies. Additional research funds were provided by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the Cornell College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Alumni Foundation. M.J.Z. and L.F.K. acknowledge support by the NSF (DMR-1654596) and Packard Foundation. This work uses research conducted at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) which is supported by the National Science Foundation under award DMR-1332208. The Cornell Center for Materials Research (CCMR) is funded by NSF MRSEC (DMR-1719875). Research described in this paper was performed at the Canadian Light Source (CLS), which is supported by the Canada Foundation for Innovation, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the University of Saskatchewan, the Government of Saskatchewan, Western Economic Diversification Canada, the National Research Council Canada, and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyPossinger, Angela R., Michael J. Zachman, James J. Dynes, Tom Z. Regier, Lena F. Kourkoutis, and Johannes Lehmann. “Co-Precipitation Induces Changes to Iron and Carbon Chemistry and Spatial Distribution at the Nanometer Scale.” Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 314 (December 2021): 1–15. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gca.2021.09.003.
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/*
dc.subjectCo-precipitation
dc.subjectAdsorption
dc.subjectsoil organic matter
dc.subjectElectron energy loss spectroscopy
dc.titleData From: Co-precipitation Induces Changes to Iron and Carbon Chemistry and Spatial Distribution at the Nanometer Scaleen_US
dc.typedataseten_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyurihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.gca.2021.09.003
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.7298/6134-h423
schema.accessibilityHazardnoneen_US


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