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dc.contributor.authorCollins, Christopher J.
dc.contributor.authorsm, Ken G.
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-06T16:43:23Z
dc.date.available2021-07-06T16:43:23Z
dc.date.issued2006-06
dc.identifier.citationCollins, C. J., & Smith, K. G. (2006). Knowledge exchange and combination: The role of human resource practices in the performance of high-technology firms. Academy of Management Journal, 49(3): 544-560.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/103963
dc.description.abstractIn this study, we developed and tested a theory of how human resource practices affect the organizational social climate conditions that facilitate knowledge exchange and combination and resultant firm performance. A field study of 136 technology companies showed that commitment-based human resource practices were positively related to the organizational social climates of trust, cooperation, and shared codes and language. In turn, these measures of a firm's social climate were related to the firm's capability to exchange and combine knowledge, a relationship that predicted firm revenue from new products and services and firm sales growth.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAcademy of Managementen_US
dc.subjectknowledge exchangeen_US
dc.subjecthuman resource practicesen_US
dc.subjectknowledge combinationen_US
dc.subjectfirm performanceen_US
dc.titleKnowledge Exchange and Combination: The Role of Human Resource Practices in the Performance of High-Technology Firmsen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.relation.doihttps://doi.org/10.5465/amj.2006.21794671en_US
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schema.accessibilitySummaryAccessible pdfen_US


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