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dc.contributor.authorCompa, Lance
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-09T16:33:38Z
dc.date.available2020-12-09T16:33:38Z
dc.date.issued1995-04-01
dc.identifier.other1229801
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/102660
dc.description.abstract[Excerpt] No country or company should gain a commercial edge in international trade by jailing or killing union organizers, crushing independent union movements, or banning strikes. Gaining an advantage in labor costs should not depend on exploiting child labor or forced labor, or discriminating against women or oppressed ethnic groups. Deliberately exposing workers to life-threatening safety and health hazards, or holding wages and benefits below livable levels should not be permissible corporate strategies. But these are exactly the abuses that happen all too often in a rapidly globalized world trading system based on "free trade."
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesLabor Research Review
dc.subjectlabor rights
dc.subjectforced labor
dc.subjectchild labor
dc.subjectdiscrimination
dc.subjectgender
dc.subjectethnicity
dc.subjectglobalization
dc.title...And the Twain Shall Meet? A North-South Controversy Over Labor Rights and Trade
dc.typearticle
schema.issueNumberVol. 1, Num. 23
dc.description.legacydownloadsIssue_23_____Article_10.pdf: 572 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.


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