Now showing items 1-9 of 9

    • 1973 Field research report on Cabbage maggot, seedcorn maggot, and aster leafhopper 

      Eckenrode, C.; Robbins, P.; Webb, D. (New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, 1974-09)
      The threat of insecticide resistance, label cancellation of still-effective pesticides, and changing planting patterns dictate the need for continued evaluation of candidate materials for control of the cabbage maggot, ...
    • 1974 insecticide research report in cabbage maggot, seedcorn maggot, aphids on lettuce, and phytotoxicity in cucumbers 

      Eckenrode, C.; Robbins, P.; Webb, D. (New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, 1975-08)
      Each year we conduct extensive insecticide screening tests for control of the cabbage maggot (CM), an important soil pest of crucifer crops. Diazinon, a phosphate pesticide of limited persistence, is this State's single ...
    • Control of seedcorn maggot, cabbage maggot, and black cutworm (1975 insecticide research report) 

      Eckenrode, C.; Robbins, P.; Webb, D. (New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, 1976-06)
      This pest threatens the germinating seeds of a number of crops, particularly in the spring when soils are cool and wet. A high content of organic matter in the soil increases the probability for an infestation. Once the ...
    • An Improved Screen Cone Trap for Monitoring Activity of Flying Insects 

      Throne, J.; Robbins, P.; Eckenrode, C. (New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, 1984)
      The traps, as originally described, are difficult to build because the components are soldered together, and the traps must be replaced after three to four summers' use because of rusting. We report here a modified ...
    • The onion maggot and its control in New York 

      Ellis, P.; Eckenrode, C. (New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, 1979-05)
      The onion maggot, Hylemya antiqua (Meigen), is the most important insect pest of onions in Canada and in the northeastern and northcentral United States. This pest first reached North America from Europe in 1841, and ...
    • Onion Maggot Management in New York, Michigan, and Wisconsin 

      Eckenrode, C.; Nyrop, J. (New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, 1995)
      The onion maggot (OM) continues to threaten commercial onion production in New York (ca. 12,000 acres), Michigan (ca. 8,000 acres), and Wisconsin (ca. 2,000 acres). In these states, onions are intensively grown on high ...
    • Predicting Cabbage Maggot Flights in New York Using Common Wild Plants 

      Pedersen, L.; Eckenrode, C. (New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, 1981)
      The purpose of this study was to correlate blooming of wild plants commonly seen near cabbage fields with cabbage maggot flights to provide growers with an accurate prediction tool so that timely applications of ...
    • Seedcorn Maggot Injury 

      Vea, E.; Webb, D.; Eckenrode, C. (New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, 1975-05)
      This report describes and illustrates varying levels of seedcorn maggot damage on eight susceptible crops. We hope that this will aid in the diagnosis of maggot injury.
    • Simplified rearing and bioassay for the seedcorn maggot, Hylemya platura (Meigen) 

      Webb, D.; Eckenrode, C. (New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, 1978-06)
      Before 1926, Leach (7) was able to rear larvae of the seedcorn maggot (SCM), now known as Hylemya platura (Meigen), on potatoes or beef extract agar inoculated with the causal organism of potato blackleg, Erwinia ...