Now showing items 1-6 of 6

    • Designing a Calculational Logic Theorem Prover: Insight into SearchProcedure via Eye Movements 

      Aaron, Eric; Spivey, Michael (Cornell University, 1998-05)
      We are designing and implementing an automated theorem prover that will in part attempt to simulate human performance on calculational logic theorem proving. To support this project, we recorded and analyzed people's eye ...
    • Formal Justification of Underspecification for S5 

      Aaron, Eric; Gries, David (Cornell University, 1997-02)
      We formalize the notion of underspecification as a means of avoiding problems with partial functions in modal logic S5 and some semantically related logics. For these logics, underspecification respects validity, so ...
    • Frequency vs. Probability Formats: Framing the Three Doors Problem 

      Aaron, Eric; Spivey-Knowlton, Michael (Cornell University, 1998-04)
      Instead of subscribing to the view that people are unable to perform Bayesian probabilistic inference, recent research suggests that the algorithms people naturally use to perform Bayesian inference are better adapted for ...
    • Insight into Theorem Proving via Eye Movements 

      Aaron, Eric; Spivey, Michael (Cornell University, 1999-02)
      We are implementing an automated theorem proving system that will in part attempt to simulate human per-formance on calculational logic. To support this project, we recorded and analyzed people's eye movements while they ...
    • Justifying Calculational Logic by a Conventional Metalinguistic Semantics 

      Aaron, Eric; Allen, Stuart (Cornell University, 1999-09)
      We provide a metalinguistic formalization of calculational logic, an alternative to higher-order logic for escaping the restrictions of first-order logic. We show that conventional semantic techniques can provide an ...
    • Tactic-Based Modeling of Cognitive Inference on Logically StructuredNotation 

      Aaron, Eric (Cornell University, 2000-09-06)
      Computational (algorithmic) models of high-level cognitive inference tasks such as logical inference, mathematical inference, and decision making can have both theoretical and practical impact. They can improve our theoretical ...